The Political Economy of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, and U.S. Policy in the Congo Crisis

The Political Economy of Third World Intervention Mines Money and U S Policy in the Congo Crisis Interventionism the manipulation of the internal politics of one country by another has long been a feature of international relations The practice shows no signs of abating despite the recent collap

Interventionism the manipulation of the internal politics of one country by another has long been a feature of international relations The practice shows no signs of abating, despite the recent collapse of Communism and the decline of the Cold War.In The Political Economy of Third World Intervention, David Gibbs explores the factors that motivate intervention, especiallyInterventionism the manipulation of the internal politics of one country by another has long been a feature of international relations The practice shows no signs of abating, despite the recent collapse of Communism and the decline of the Cold War.In The Political Economy of Third World Intervention, David Gibbs explores the factors that motivate intervention, especially the influence of business interests He challenges conventional views of international relations, eschewing both the popular realist view that the state is influenced by diverse national interests and the dependency approach that stresses conflicts between industrialized countries and the Third World Instead, Gibbs proposes a new theoretical model of business conflict which stresses divisions between different business interests and shows how such divisions can influence foreign policy and interventionism Moreover, he focuses on the conflicts among the core countries, highlighting friction among private interests within these countries.Drawing on U.S government documents including a wealth of newly declassified materials he applies his new model to a detailed case study of the Congo Crisis of the 1960s Gibbs demonstrates that the Crisis is accurately characterized by competition among Western interests for access to the Congo s mineral wealth, than by Cold War competition, as has been previously argued.Offering a fresh perspective for und

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The Political Economy of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, and U.S. Policy in the Congo Crisis

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  1. David N. Gibbs Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Political Economy of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, and U.S. Policy in the Congo Crisis book, this is one of the most wanted David N. Gibbs author readers around the world.

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The Political Economy of Third World Intervention: Mines, Money, and U.S. Policy in the Congo Crisis Comment

  1. a surprisingly interesting read for a dissertation very heavily footnoted gibbs really did his research, and he makes a compelling case for the business conflict model as a way to explain Eisenhower and Kennedy policies regarding the Congo.


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