Transit

Transit The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline one of The New York Times Book Review s ten best books of In the wake of family collapse a writer and her two young sons move to L

The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline, one of The New York Times Book Review s ten best books of 2015.In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London The process of upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions personal, moral, artistic, practical as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and herThe stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline, one of The New York Times Book Review s ten best books of 2015.In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London The process of upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions personal, moral, artistic, practical as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children In the city she is made to confront aspects of living she has, until now, avoided, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, and believe in, life.Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed Outline, and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering, the moral problems of personal responsibility, and the mystery of change In this precise, short, and yet epic cycle of novels, Cusk manages to describe the most elemental experiences, the liminal qualities of life, through a narrative near silence that draws language toward it She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one s life and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real.

  • [PDF] Transit | by ☆ Rachel Cusk
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Transit

About Author

  1. Rachel Cusk was born in Canada, and spent some of her childhood in Los Angeles, before her family returned to England, in 1974, when Cusk was 8yo She read English at New College, Oxford.Cusk is the Whitbread Award winning author of two memoirs, including The Last Supper, and seven novels, including Arlington Park, Saving Agnes, The Temporary, The Country Life, and The Lucky Ones She has won and been shortlisted for numerous prizes her most recent novel, Outline 2014 , was shortlisted for the Folio Prize, the Goldsmith s Prize and the Bailey s prize, and longlisted for Canada s Giller Prize In 2003, Rachel Cusk was nominated by Granta magazine as one of 20 Best of Young British Novelists She lives in Brighton, England.

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Transit Comment

  1. This continues the pattern started in its predecessor Outline Once again the narrator Leah remains something of a blank cipher and most of the story is generated by the people she talks to, a shifting cast that allows Cusk to cover a wide range of subjects, experiences and situations There is a bit of Leah s own life in this one as she moves back to London and deals with builders and difficult neighbours, but for the most part the observational pattern is maintained.As always the writing is bea [...]


  2. Rachel Cusk s dreamlike Outline, about a writer s trip to Greece in the aftermath of a divorce, was one of my favorite novels of 2015 Wandering in the languid heat of Athens, the main character, Faye, is something of an empty vessel, less supplying her own narrative than simply listening to the stories of the people around her but all of these stories, viewed through Faye s eyes, are about her just as much as they are about the students, dinner companions, and fellow travelers who pass through h [...]


  3. Sometimes when I come upon a book by chance and not through premeditated research, there is a sense of excitement, as when I read my first books and every book that followed had the potential to be great or a great failure or both Maybe it s the danger of going outside of any known rubric for selection Fate looms, as if each book was meant to be stumbled upon at its time and place rather than arrived at through well manicured avenues.Whatever the case, it s lead me to great reads before I once s [...]


  4. There s a great moment in this episodic, suggestive, quasi memoir in which the narrator Faye is teaching a creative writing class and a dominant, forceful student instructs another that he can t just say his dog is beautiful, he needs to show the dog, evoke it, and the dog owner student guy gets a little flustered and says something like I dunno she s a beautiful dog, and then Faye simply asks what breed it is, and the dog owner student totally naturally unleashes no pun intended but hey look at [...]


  5. Is it a novel this sequence of unrelated interludes recounted in an aloof tone of voice Rachel Cusk s book opens as the narrator a writer moves back to her old London neighbourhood with her two sons, buying an ex council flat sorely in need of improvement and with a pair of nasty neighbours living below She bumps into an old boyfriend and they have an unrealistic conversation She has her starting to grey hair tinted for the first time and her hairdresser conducts an unlikely monologue She meets [...]


  6. One common marker of the postmodern condition is ahistoricality Myself personally , I take a great interest in the history of literature specializing in post WWII american fiction a very narrow range, true and I mean it always helps in understanding, for example, any intellectual giant, to trace out the arc of their bio history Heidegger s infamous Kehre Anyways, I m often terribly struck by how ahistorical are the processes of many folks trying to understand things, like for instance The God of [...]


  7. The structure of this book is brilliant I love how the stories focus on these deep conversations with all the other characters she comes across, and that we only learn about Faye through what she volunteers in these interactions I do think we learn a lot about Faye in this book, and it s clever to only use her name once I liked Outline well enough, but I think Transit was much interesting For me, it was as though in Outline the author explored her ideas about structure and found her stride in [...]


  8. while continuing in the style and ideas cusk created with Outline, a book that i appreciated but didn t love, i found transit offered emotional depth we still don t get a whole lot of focus on faye herself, but her interactions and conversations with those she encounters give us glimpses into faye s life, as well as a some great insights to human nature and relationships we are so messy and complicated.


  9. An astrologer emailed me to say she had important new for me concerning events in my immediate future She could see things that I could not my personal details had come into her possession and had allowed her to study the planets for their information She wished me to know that a major transit was due to occur shortly in my sky This information was causing her great excitement when she considered the changes it might represent For a small fee she would share it with me and enable me to turn it t [...]


  10. I enjoyed this even than Outline and could have read another 200 pages There are subtle things happening here, and the character Fern Fran I ve forgotten her name because it is not emphasized who was a cipher in Outline, who seemed an audience to others, is present in this novel but just barely She speaks , but even when she barely speaks a word these felt like conversations than soliloquies She s able to hold her own or to offer opinions, but sometimes opts not to But the way the novel is w [...]


  11. Claramente, este es uno de esos libros especiales que, o te cautivan desde la primera p gina, o lo dejas a la mitad Ya conoc a a Rachel Cusk y su estilo experimental A Contraluz que me cautiv desde la primera l nea as que leerla en este libro que sigue la l nea del anterior ha sido un placer Es un libro que he subrayado con un mont n de frases para reflexionar Su capacidad de observaci n y an lisis es contagiosa y, si bien a nivel narrativo puede tener cabos sueltos, a nivel global es una maravi [...]


  12. Despite Faye s being the narrator of this quasi memoir, we only learn about her obliquely, and only learn her name by chance The facts of her own life are dovetailed in among stories she hears from others she comes into contact with while transitioning into another life contractor, his workmen, friends, her students These well rounded characterizations each form a complete portrait Cusk writes like no one else, but it would be truer to say this is an unconventional novel rather than an experimen [...]


  13. 4.5 I enjoyed this slightly than Outline, the first volume in Cusk s proposed trilogy I am still not quite so sure where all of this is leading, or what the ultimate point of all these stories are, but I do find them fascinating reading.


  14. Joint review with OutlineOutstanding and innovative novels, the first two parts of a planned trilogy The books are narrated by a writer and now creative writing teacher, a recently divorced mother of two boys this together with her name Faye mentioned only once in each book is almost all we know about her Instead the book, narrated in the first person, is the record of various conversations with she has in which she plays a typically passive role listening to the other person s life story and pe [...]


  15. As good as the first part in this trilogy, Outline.Goes against anything you will hear in a basic writing course.Cusk is a fresh voice in Book Land.I love her ways Btw Not for everybody


  16. 4.5 starsI really love Rachel Cusk s detached yet voyeuristic way of telling a story This is a terrific follow up to Outline It follows the same protagonist, our writer Faye, as she tries to negotiate single life with her sons in London She has to deal with ridiculous, impossible downstairs neighbors, builders and friends I can t wait to read the third installment in this trilogy of sorts These novels read a bit like memoir so I m also interested in checking out Cusk s nonfiction work.


  17. An astrologer emailed me to say she had important news for me concerning events in my immediate future She could see things that I could not my personal details had come into her possession and had allowed her to study the planets for their information She wished me to know that a major transit was due to occur shortly in my sky This information was causing her great excitement when she considered the changes it might represent For a small fee she would share it with me and enable me to turn it [...]


  18. I think I enjoyed this even than I did Cusk s preceding novel Outline This one is part two of a trilogy in which Outline is part one I don t think it is absolutely necessary to read Outline before you read Transit, but I do think the experience of Transit is much richer with the background knowledge that Outline provides.The narrator in both books is the same In Outline, we struggled to learn much about this narrator, although we could piece together a few bits of her story Outline works by mea [...]


  19. It took me a while to get into Outline but once I did I loved it Transit picks up beautifully from where Outline left off and it s so good Cusk is giving us so much with these novels.


  20. Oooh, I liked this so much than Outline It felt really voyeuristic and made me feel kinda naughty for eavesdropping on such personal stuff Brilliant It also felt satisfying and complete, even though they were really only loosely connected vignettes Aces, Rachel Can t fault this one.



  21. I read Outline last week, my first Rachel Cusk, as a precursor to Transit, and as my introduction to the Goldsmiths Prize, a literary competition designed to reward fiction that breaks the mould or extends the possibilities of the novel form.I am not convinced by either Rachel Cusk s writing in general, nor that Transit, could claim to meet the Goldsmiths criteria for inclusion.Cusk s books are a series of short, self contained, stories that hang together because of the presence of the same narr [...]


  22. a brilliant novel.What moves you most in a work of literature The tremendous effort of exactitude Rachel Cusk By the Book, NYTimes Book Review, Jan 5, 2017



  23. I love where Cusk is going with this series, I just give in, swept along by the stories Faye draws out from others, occasionally jolted by a searing insight or a provocation She is very clever, but not in the bloodless way some of her earlier books have suggested.


  24. Marcel Proust said, near the end of his novel, These memories , on the contrary, instead of giving me a flattering idea of myself, had almost caused me to doubt the reality, the existence of the self Cusk s much much shorter novels are not as explicit about the search her character is living, but similar questions about things are happening somewhere inside her.


  25. In short this is rather similar to Outline but somehow not nearly as good.To expand on the above Transit follows the same narrator from Outline, Faye, however this time she is back on home soil We join her when she is house hunting in London, where she eventually ends up buying an ex council house which is desperately in need of extensive renovation As I said, Transit follows a very similar structure to Outline, with Faye meeting various people who she talks but mostly listens to about life, fam [...]


  26. I was bought this book as a gift, and didn t realise until this very moment that it had a predecessor I wondered if this was why I maybe didn t get it, but quickly realised I did get it I just didn t like it.Faye moves to London with her two sons in the aftermath of her divorce Once there, she stumbles into various people with whom she has highly unlikely conversations These small glimpses of sub characters lives are what make up the plot I m sure there s something there about Faye making sense [...]


  27. I read this immediately following Outline, and so Cusk s trilogy was very much on my mind throughout this 2nd book The tone removed, bemused is the same here There s much detail about the narrator s life Cusk is filling out the outline Again, there s a readability to this novel that I can t explain Trying to piece together who this narrator is is extremely satisfying, like using those magic pens on coloring books, where the picture emerges slowly However, I can t really judge Transit as a stand [...]


  28. This followup to the excellent Outline is another wonderful string of stories told to the first person narrator, a writer Cusk does a great job of moving naturally through and among the storytellers as the narrator goes through her daily life in London, and yet the novel is not naturalistic The narrator s daily life is the frame for a wide range of stories from a wide range of individuals from, as they say, all walks of life few of them run The principal theme is free will vs fate Fine prose, fi [...]


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