The God Wave

Book The God Wave A group of scientists and research subjects experiment with using brain waves to cause physical outcomes

Book The God Wave A group of scientists and research subjects experiment with using brain waves to cause physical outcomes on objects, computer programs, etc. Their research is promising enough that they set up a company to further the research and exploit its practical applications. Some of the subjects develop abilities that are way beyond the original scope of the experiments. Naturally their work attracts the attention of a shadowy governmental operation that hires them to train its operatives. Of course this doesn't end well. The build up in this book is somewhat slow but the last 20% or so has a lot of action, and then it just ends.As the author's first book, it's not the most artfully drafted book I've ever read, but it was entertaining. This sci fi thriller is the first of a trilogy and so far I'm interested enough to want to continue with the second book. Unfortunately, that's pretty much required, since nothing is resolved here. This book is just a set up for the next book and ends with a cliff hanger. Enter shadowy organization number 2. . The God Wave Viral Ebook A team of neuroscientists uncover amazing new capabilities in the brain that may steer human evolution toward miraculous and deadly frontiers in this spectacular debut work of speculative science fiction Limitless meets James Rollins that combines spirituality and science in an inventive, mind blowing fashion.For decades, scientists have speculated about the untapped potenA team of neuroscientists uncover amazing new capabilities in the brain that may steer human evolution toward miraculous and deadly frontiers in this spectacular debut work of speculative science fiction Limitless meets James Rollins that combines spirituality and science in an inventive, mind blowing fashion.For decades, scientists have speculated about the untapped potential of the human brain Now, neuroscientist Chuck Brenton has made an astonishing breakthrough He has discovered the key the crucial combination of practice and conditioning to access the incredible power dormant in ninety percent of our brains Applying his methods to test subjects, he has stimulated abilities that elevate brain function to seemingly godlike levels These extraordinary abilities can transform the world, replacing fear and suffering with tranquility and stability But in an age of increasing militarization, corporate exploitation, and explosive technological discovery, a group of influential powerbrokers are determined to control these new superbeings for their own manipulative ends and their motives may be far from peaceful.. Patrick Hemstreet is a novelist, neuro engineer, entrepreneur, patent pending inventor, special warfare trained Navy medic, standup comic, and actor He lives in Houston, Texas with his wife and sons The God Wave is his first novel.. Popular Books The God Wave What is the potential of the human brain? We have all heard the line about how people use only 10% of our capacity, which is almost certainly not true. But what if people could be trained to harness the untapped portion, whatever percentage that might be? What might the limits be for the human brain? Telekinesis? How strong? How far? What else might the human brain be able to do unleashed from our current limitations? Telepathy? Mind control? If that brain is suddenly empowered, what does that imply about the humanity of the enhanced? Are they still human, or a new type of human, say homo invictus? What might that mean for the rest of us? Patrick HemstreetChuck Benton, a neuroscience researcher and professor at Johns Hopkins, wants to be able to translate the brain waves that everyone generates into real world application. If brain waves could move the needle on an EEG printout, why couldn’t those waves be harnessed to real-world purposes? Why not drive a car with brain power alone, or paint a picture? All that would be needed is the proper interface. And therein lies the challenge. Benton may be a genius in his field, but he needs a higher understanding of math in order to translate brain waves into commands, let alone actions.MIT professor Matt Streegman is not exactly the most social person on the planet. But when he hears Benton being interviewed on an episode of Ira Flatow’s Science Friday, a lightbulb flashes on. Streegman might be a bit more social but for one thing. His wife, Lucy, lies in a hospital, comatose, but still possessing active brain waves. What if he could use Benton’s work to try to actually communicate with Lucy? Streegman has the math. His work on robotics interfaces gives him a unique appreciation for communication challenges. When he goes to see Benton a few days later, solution in hand, it is the beginning of a giant leap for mankind.Chuck and Matt set to work straight away. A diverse group of subjects is recruited, including a gamer, a martial arts specialist, an artist, a construction worker and others, and the game is on. Progress is intermittent and challenges many, but if they did not accomplish something special, the author would have had to come up with a very different title for his book. Three books actually. The copy I read was an ARE, and there is no indication, at least none that I spotted, that The God Wave is the first book in a trilogy. That it was not intended to be a stand-alone was pretty clear as I kept getting closer to the end and it seemed that the story-telling possibilities kept expanding. The God Wave of the title refers to a brain wave (like alpha, beta or gamma) that operates at an inhumanly high frequency, a state some of the test subjects achieve. Once there, they manifest abilities that are cool, impressive, and scary. The ramp up in the story-telling is a bit slow, but once underway the action is fast-paced and very engaging. Tension builds nicely. When their sugar daddy super-secret military group, Deep Shield, gets more involved than is comfortable, it does not take enhanced brain waves to see that our intrepid scientists and their team could be in some deep poo. There are internal tensions as well, with Chuck’s starry-eyed vision of helping humanity running into Matt’s desire for a very large payday. We see the growth of the test subjects, and the alarming abilities the interface is nurturing. And no, they are not using Professor Harold Hill’s Think system. We also see the increasing control being exercised by the baddies. Hemstreet injects a bit of humor, as the scientists and their team refer to the ever more numerous security personnel as Smiths, a Matrix ref. There will be battles. The force will be used.Smiths - from The EnquirerSo, a nifty sci-fi, maybe twenty minutes into the future. Hemstreet uses tropes of the genre, which is perfectly ok if done well, and they are. And there are plenty of references to other material of this sort, from a scene that offers a nod to Aliens to scenes that will feel familiar to fans of the original Robo-Cop. One would have to suspect that a character named Kobayashi would be a reference to the infamous Star Trek training mission And there are plenty more overt mentions. Independence Day and Transformers pop to mind. So, a bit of fun in this. I did have some gripes, of course. While I do not expect from a book of this sort the degree of character development one might find in a literary novel, I thought his two primaries were a touch thin. I found it not at all credible that a scientist would enter into a major business contract without having his lawyer check it out. I felt that the condition of Matt’s wife, raised early as a significant motivational factor, seemed to get lost a bit. A more regular update would have been welcome. Early on there is a concept tossed off that I found a bit dodgy. “..the human brain is an interpretative interface between the mind and the human body.” Really? If there even is such a thing as the mind there has been no evidence I am aware of that demonstrates its existence without a human brain to generate it. Tossing out this notion of the mind as an independent entity as a universally accepted fact seems disingenuous. I don’t mind a bit of truthiness in a work of science fiction, but it seemed unnecessary to go there, at least in this volume. Hemstreet has had a hand in the neurodiagnostics biz, (although his Linked In page indicates only a BA in liberal arts) so we presume he knows a thing or two about gray matter, and what may or may not be possible. But he does not limit his look to the purely scientific, however speculative. He offers adult consideration of diverse perspectives. I was particularly impressed with his dialectic on security versus openness. Considering that this is Hemstreet’s first novel, it is pretty impressive. He keeps things moving along nicely, ramps up tensions with aplomb, tosses in a fair number of surprises, brings considerable creativity to bear, offers some adult perspective on real-world issues and looks at theoretical sources of potential ethical conflict as well. I was disappointed when the book ended and I hope that volume 2 will be in print before too long. Maybe if I concentrate really, really hard…Review posted – 1/29/16Publication date – 5/17/16=============================EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s Twitter and FB pagesIra Flato’s Science Friday is a real show and definitely worth checking outThe 10% myth - a wiki and a nifty look by Neuroscience for Kids Experiments on Tibetan Buddhist monks have shown a correlation between transcendental mental states andgamma waves

About Author

  1. Patrick Hemstreet is a novelist, neuro engineer, entrepreneur, patent pending inventor, special warfare trained Navy medic, standup comic, and actor He lives in Houston, Texas with his wife and sons The God Wave is his first novel.

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The God Wave Comment

  1. What is the potential of the human brain We have all heard the line about how people use only 10% of our capacity, which is almost certainly not true But what if people could be trained to harness the untapped portion, whatever percentage that might be What might the limits be for the human brain Telekinesis How strong How far What else might the human brain be able to do unleashed from our current limitations Telepathy Mind control If that brain is suddenly empowered, what does that imply about [...]


  2. A group of scientists and research subjects experiment with using brain waves to cause physical outcomes on objects, computer programs, etc Their research is promising enough that they set up a company to further the research and exploit its practical applications Some of the subjects develop abilities that are way beyond the original scope of the experiments Naturally their work attracts the attention of a shadowy governmental operation that hires them to train its operatives Of course this doe [...]


  3. First I have to disclose I was given this book by Harper Voyager to review This was fan freaking tastic Haven t said that about a book in a while I probably would have read this thing in two days, but alas, life she gets in the way I really enjoyed this book you can tell, can t you His writing is smooth, easy to understand, YET it s smart, intelligent and YET if you are not too bright you could still probably read this book If you like Neil Stephenson or even Michael Crichton, you will probably [...]


  4. The God Wave is a perfect storm of tech fi infused with plausible reality Author Patrick Hemstreet, a neuroengineer has crafted a dynamic and thought provoking tech thriller that, true to the blurb, captures the imagination and possibilities of Limitless and bumps it up a notch or two into X Men territory by giving his characters superhuman abilities straight from the pages of superhero comics It reads so damn real it s scary Neuroscientist Chuck Brenton and MIT Professor Matt Streegman make a s [...]


  5. This is an okay book, but it has too much of a been there done that feel coupled with cardboard characters It doesn t help that it has been overhyped On the cover a Kirkus quote screams A flat out astonishing debut It s not.This is well trod territory Even the concept has been used innumerable times before It s just another technology unleashes superpowers story, in this case telepresence leading to telekinesis Which is fine, but you really need stellar writing to sell such a well worn trope At [...]


  6. The God Wave by Patrick HemstreetThis novel may be a authentic peek into the future Consider the brain operated drones for a moment and how experiments are progressing with the brain operating prosthesis hands This book goes a large but not inconceivable step forward in the direction of the main character in the movie Lucy The thesis is the mind can be trained into using of its potential Hemstreet postulated two believable characters in Matt and Chuck Matt as a bereaved pragmatic genius and Chu [...]


  7. Die Gotteswelle von Patrick Hemstreet Band 1 der God Wave Trilogie Erschienen im HarperCollins Verlag am 18 Juli 2016Der Neurowissenschaftler Chuck Brenton forscht an der John Hopkins University Er versucht Gehirnwellen direkt nutzbar zu machen Als Matt Streegman, ein Mathematiker, dazu kommt, kommt Bewegung in die Sache und sie dringen in Bereiche des Gehirns vor, in dem noch nie ein Mensch zuvor gewesen ist Als sie ihre Forschungsergebnisse anfangen der Welt zu zeigen, meldet sich schnell eine [...]


  8. Man oh man, books like this are why I love being a Harper Voyager Super Reader Just think, they sent me this book for free with the only requirement being that I give them an honest review Sweeeeeeeeet Ok, so the official blurb is Limitless meets James Rollins but to tell you the truth, Patrick Hemstreet out James Rollins James Rollins I say this because over the last 8 or 10 years Rollins has just flooded the market with works revolving around the same characters, to the point that in compariso [...]


  9. THE GOD WAVEby Patrick HemstreetYou have to love What If Science Fiction Taking something we know as a jump off point and casting everything into a whirlwind of possibility One of my favorite stories to date is Star Man , posing the question what if someone answered the invitation we put in our space probe Patrick Hemstreet takes the concept of the EEG and takes it into the Fourth Dimension Turning the pages, I found myself thinking, Well, what would happen if and isn t that the whole point I ap [...]


  10. Good book, interesting premise, well developed I m very critical of ending in book these days, I m usually disappointed by them, this one s ok and set s up a sequel so we ll see how it progress I will read the sequel if there is one as it was interesting enough to continue Good work for a first book Patrick.


  11. Too much a please, Hollywood, buy me and turn me into a mediocre action movie, pleeeeeeeease.If the American Military were this stupid, we d be all speaking Russian by now.Flat and stereotyped characters, linear predictable plot, kinda sad.


  12. When I read the back cover about the genetic advancements in telepathy and how that could change our world, I thought this book is exactly what I want to read Checking out the author s background made me even excited because the book to come would have authentic scientific reasoning behind the advancements The first third of the book reinforced these hopeful predictions The gamma waves, zeta waves, and how each experimental lab rat developed their powers was fascinating science I loved the idea [...]


  13. Patrick Hemstreet tells of neuroscientist Chuck Brenton who works with advanced EEGs created from creative volunteers Then he has a bright idea that the EEGs could be used to allow direct manipulation of computer effects Working with a mathematician Matthew Streegman and others they soon discover that their subjects can create what they call a zeta brain wave, The God Wave paper from HarperCollins Publishers , allows subjects to do impossible things like telekinesis Unfortunately their company s [...]


  14. I think I was hoping for a little from this book like a deeper dig into the unforeseen or existential consequences of the premise But that being said, it was an enjoyable light SF read for the most part The premise was cool enough, but the story felt very surface level and the characters were pretty one dimensional It reminded me a bit of Blake Crouch s Dark Matter stylistically especially It sacrifices the inner experience of the characters to keep the plot moving which isn t necessarily a bad [...]


  15. The premise sounded so cool humans unlocking radical mind powers and progressing to the next state of human evolution Awesome The story ended up plodding along, laboriously, with some technical details thrown in that likely would impress someone who had never used a computer before and didn t know the difference between a wifi router and a microwave oven, and then some Michael Bay style over the top stuff starts happening around page 300, and you know what, I don t think I ll be tuning in for th [...]


  16. Started 7 27 17 finished 8 4 17 Good science fiction thriller about the not too distant future If brain waves can move a needle on a graph, what else can brain waves move or control Two men become partners in this endeavor one sees science as bettering mankind, the other bettering his wallet Then of course a super secret military unit becomes involved, and we all know how that will turn out Lots of action in the 2nd half of this debut novel, including car chases, explosions, you know, the usual [...]


  17. Eh 2.5 stars Don t get the rave reviews Kinda silly, and very unrealistic For example a the concept of how people were able to make the jump to avoiding spoilers use of the God Wave for basically absolutely whatever wasn t remotely thought out or explained silly, b the idea that either of the two main founders would or could spring such material surprises on each other silly, and c again, vague so as to avoid spoilers the whole story with General Howard extra silly Basically a lightweight, less [...]


  18. First, I received this book from for my review I anticipated this story as it blended high technology with excellent ways to use this new technology But the nefarious bad guy has other ideas With mind control, robots can be used as undefeatible military weapons Great premise, but the ending disappointed Since there now is a sequel available, I understand that the author has left things dangling to create an audience for book 2 I will give this a 3.5 which should have been a 4.


  19. I do not know enough what a laugh nothing about neuroscience or robotics to know if this story is believable, but from where I come from it seems to make sense The last couple of chapters especially kept you on edge, waiting to see what would happen.


  20. Really great premise gives you much to think about The characters are not really well developed but there is an increasing amount of action as you go on I am hopeful that in future books, the author explores of the ramifications of The God Wave, as it is quite fascinating.


  21. Great premiseEntertaining read Occasionally the characters or setting felt two dimensional, but overall a great story I loved the premise of controlled human evolution A little like X men









  22. It started out a bit slow, but still very interesting and I was curious to see how it the technology and the plot would develop Then the pace picked up and I couldn t put it down I think I spent two weeks on the first half and two days on the second A very good debut.


  23. First Reads advanced copy My final rating would actually be 3 1 2 stars Overall I found The God Wave to be an enjoyable read There were a few things that prevented me from rating it higher though First off, I found it to start of rather slow The characters seemed a bit generic I had a light bit of trouble keeping track of which one was which since a couple had similar names Once the military got involved around the halfway point in the book the pace of the story certainly picked up This made rea [...]


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