Compleat Cat

Zip Compleat Cat I could say Cleveland Amory is an acquired taste but whenever that cliche comes to mind I instantly think of Harry Dean Stanton s smart ass riposte to was it Crispin Glover in Alm

Zip Compleat Cat I could say Cleveland Amory is an acquired taste, but whenever that cliche comes to mind I instantly think of Harry Dean Stanton's smart-ass riposte to (was it Crispin Glover?) in Almereyda's Twister: "It seems to me you can acquire a taste for anything, but the question is, why would you want to?" That's not the movie with the cows flying around. That's the schlub Twister. And so it is with Amory. One wonders why one is bothering to try to acquire a taste for an author who is a self-admitted curmudgeon and who resorts to such cheap tricks as making a cute cat (always prominently featured on the cover) the sugar candy to draw you close enough to his book to possibly check it out, and then, KA-CHING!, make the purchase. Well, the strategy works, as this is one in a series of very successful books, which are really autobiographical. Human autobiographical, that is. Polar Bear (the titular kitty) does make an appearance every now and then, but one quickly gets the impression Mr. Amory is mostly conducting his assay of Polar Bear's character via the psychological mechanism of projection. Polar Bear is getting old. Mr. Amory is getting old. Polar Bear is intolerant of most of humanity. Mr. Amory is intolerant of most of humanity. Polar Bear is constipated. Mr. Amory is constipated. And so on. This installment in the series focuses mostly on aging, both feline and human, and Amory reflects on his long and sometimes lucky life in a somewhat acerbic style. He is occasionally funny. He is occasionally quotable. But mostly this remains Reader's Digest humor. It's certainly a safe book to give to that aunt or uncle who disapproves of most of your dicey reading. ("Who is this Genet, dear? Might I enjoy his books?") Amory was the president of two major animal societies, one of which (Fund for Animals) he founded. The other one he helmed was the Anti-Vivisectionist Society (ewww, you probably are saying here, and I can't blame you--who still does vivisections?!) He seems to have led a charmed life, many failed marriages notwithstanding, and had several careers besides this feline franchise, including stints as a somewhat successful t.v. writer. One gets the impression that he feels much of his life happened to him by accident, but he remains amused by this state of affairs, which renders him a somewhat likeable narrator. The book could have used more Polar Bear and a little less Cleveland Amory, but since he had a number of famous and wealthy friends (The Hepburn family, for example) there is some gossip, which is rarely titillating but sometimes pleasantly distracting. By now you probably realize this is pretty much a bathroom book or bathtub book, a book to read on a day when you're down with the flu and the television offerings suck. He hasn't any great insights into the workings of life and won't venture a guess about any ultimate or higher meaning to the thing, but he might make you smile or giggle occasionally.(He pretty much avoids life when possible. He is a bit of a window licker.) And you'll probably feel a little like a nerd, since you'll be aware of how Reader's Digest this sort of humor is. I mean if you actually laugh at it. I admit I did. Occasionally. What I continually marveled at is the fact that Mr. Amory at the time of writing this book is a superannuated, fussy man living alone with a cat, a man who is, miraculously, NOT gay. I kept waiting for some detail to give it all away and drop the G bomb, but it never happened. He is a straight fussbucket in fuzzy slippers. Would I read another of the books in this series dedicated to the hagiography of kitties? I hate to admit that the answer is in the affirmative. I too have fuzzy slippers and enjoy a good cat every now and then. But I execrate Reader's Digest humor in general, and think Reader's Digest should be brought up on charges in an International Court for the atrocities they committed when they published those millions of abridged books. That was a low point in human history. Just because meals can be turned into t.v. dinners doesn't mean books have to undergo the same fate. . Compleat Cat Viral Kindle Cleveland Amory s three classic cat stories have been compiled for the first time into one edition, The Compleat Cat, an enchanting, moving, and humorous collection A self confessed curmudgeon and dog lover firmly established in his ways, Cleveland Amory never anticipated how one dirty and scrawny alley cat could affect his life so dramatically Underneath the New York grCleveland Amory s three classic cat stories have been compiled for the first time into one edition, The Compleat Cat, an enchanting, moving, and humorous collection A self confessed curmudgeon and dog lover firmly established in his ways, Cleveland Amory never anticipated how one dirty and scrawny alley cat could affect his life so dramatically Underneath the New York grime of this hungry stray hid a shimmering white coat and an endearing pair of green eyes Amory was smitten, and Polar Bear moved right in In The Cat Who Came for Christmas, Amory crafts a charming narrative between cat and owner Polar Bear converses through the swish of his tail, a look in his eye, and the tone of his meow A humorous battle of wits ensues between the headstrong owner and the even stubborn cat Amory s second book, The Cat and the Curmudgeon, draws us deeper still into the lives of Polar Bear and Amory, as cat and human face fame, romance, and everyday domestic crises Now rather famous, Polar Bear is uneasy about his new celebrity status, interested only in eating his fan mail Amory s final Polar Bear book, The Best Cat Ever, takes a serious twist both cat and owner fall ill with arthritis and old age complications Amory takes Polar Bear on the cat s final trip a jaunt back to his college days, where we learn about Amory s fascinating past The Compleat Cat is an exceptional invitation into the very special world of Amory and Polar Bear.. Cleveland Amory was an American author who devoted his life to promoting animal rights He was perhaps best known for his books about his cat, named Polar Bear, whom he saved from the Manhattan streets on Christmas Eve 1977 The executive director of the Humane Society of the United States described Amory as the founding father of the modern animal protection movement.. Good Ebook Compleat Cat I could say Cleveland Amory is an acquired taste, but whenever that cliche comes to mind I instantly think of Harry Dean Stanton's smart-ass riposte to (was it Crispin Glover?) in Almereyda's Twister: "It seems to me you can acquire a taste for anything, but the question is, why would you want to?" That's not the movie with the cows flying around. That's the schlub Twister. And so it is with Amory. One wonders why one is bothering to try to acquire a taste for an author who is a self-admitted curmudgeon and who resorts to such cheap tricks as making a cute cat (always prominently featured on the cover) the sugar candy to draw you close enough to his book to possibly check it out, and then, KA-CHING!, make the purchase. Well, the strategy works, as this is one in a series of very successful books, which are really autobiographical. Human autobiographical, that is. Polar Bear (the titular kitty) does make an appearance every now and then, but one quickly gets the impression Mr. Amory is mostly conducting his assay of Polar Bear's character via the psychological mechanism of projection. Polar Bear is getting old. Mr. Amory is getting old. Polar Bear is intolerant of most of humanity. Mr. Amory is intolerant of most of humanity. Polar Bear is constipated. Mr. Amory is constipated. And so on. This installment in the series focuses mostly on aging, both feline and human, and Amory reflects on his long and sometimes lucky life in a somewhat acerbic style. He is occasionally funny. He is occasionally quotable. But mostly this remains Reader's Digest humor. It's certainly a safe book to give to that aunt or uncle who disapproves of most of your dicey reading. ("Who is this Genet, dear? Might I enjoy his books?") Amory was the president of two major animal societies, one of which (Fund for Animals) he founded. The other one he helmed was the Anti-Vivisectionist Society (ewww, you probably are saying here, and I can't blame you--who still does vivisections?!) He seems to have led a charmed life, many failed marriages notwithstanding, and had several careers besides this feline franchise, including stints as a somewhat successful t.v. writer. One gets the impression that he feels much of his life happened to him by accident, but he remains amused by this state of affairs, which renders him a somewhat likeable narrator. The book could have used more Polar Bear and a little less Cleveland Amory, but since he had a number of famous and wealthy friends (The Hepburn family, for example) there is some gossip, which is rarely titillating but sometimes pleasantly distracting. By now you probably realize this is pretty much a bathroom book or bathtub book, a book to read on a day when you're down with the flu and the television offerings suck. He hasn't any great insights into the workings of life and won't venture a guess about any ultimate or higher meaning to the thing, but he might make you smile or giggle occasionally.(He pretty much avoids life when possible. He is a bit of a window licker.) And you'll probably feel a little like a nerd, since you'll be aware of how Reader's Digest this sort of humor is. I mean if you actually laugh at it. I admit I did. Occasionally. What I continually marveled at is the fact that Mr. Amory at the time of writing this book is a superannuated, fussy man living alone with a cat, a man who is, miraculously, NOT gay. I kept waiting for some detail to give it all away and drop the G bomb, but it never happened. He is a straight fussbucket in fuzzy slippers. Would I read another of the books in this series dedicated to the hagiography of kitties? I hate to admit that the answer is in the affirmative. I too have fuzzy slippers and enjoy a good cat every now and then. But I execrate Reader's Digest humor in general, and think Reader's Digest should be brought up on charges in an International Court for the atrocities they committed when they published those millions of abridged books. That was a low point in human history. Just because meals can be turned into t.v. dinners doesn't mean books have to undergo the same fate.

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  1. Cleveland Amory was an American author who devoted his life to promoting animal rights He was perhaps best known for his books about his cat, named Polar Bear, whom he saved from the Manhattan streets on Christmas Eve 1977 The executive director of the Humane Society of the United States described Amory as the founding father of the modern animal protection movement.

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Compleat Cat Comment

  1. I could say Cleveland Amory is an acquired taste, but whenever that cliche comes to mind I instantly think of Harry Dean Stanton s smart ass riposte to was it Crispin Glover in Almereyda s Twister It seems to me you can acquire a taste for anything, but the question is, why would you want to That s not the movie with the cows flying around That s the schlub Twister And so it is with Amory One wonders why one is bothering to try to acquire a taste for an author who is a self admitted curmudgeon a [...]


  2. The stories about his cat are amusing and relatable as a cat staff member myself, but the rest of the book s stories are kind of dull He will usually track his rambling stories about his other work, his friends, his opinions, or his personal experiences back to his cat, Polar Bear, but sometimes it s a huge stretch and the cat is barely involved What s nice, though, is that you get three full books, and it s only at the end of the third book that the cat finally passes away Too many animal memoi [...]


  3. This book is three in one, which is why it took me a bit of time to get through it I had to read other books in between as a sort of palate cleanser Each book is different, so if you get tired of the discussion of Polar Bear s endless antics as charming as they may be , never fear, the entire set is not devoted to that specific thread I love animals and books about animals, but there was something about the pacing of The Cat Who Came for Christmas that dragged at the end And the beginning of The [...]


  4. Oh man To be fair I have had this book sitting on my shelf for almost two decades and it s been almost that long since I ve tried to read it The reason I own a copy is because in 1995 we had a white cat and I am a cat fanatic and an avid reader so my husband thought I needed to read this book I maybe made it halfway thru and gave up My goal is to pick it back up again the the new year and start from scratch I can t ever remember what it s about only that this book has been a joke for so long in [...]


  5. Amory was the founder of the Fund for Animals in New York City and president of the New England Anti Vivisection League.The 3 books included in this volume are all fantastic and can be read independently, but if you read them in order The Cat Who Came for Christmas, The Cat and the Curmudgeon, The Best Cat Ever you re in for a treat You will get caught up in the story of this rough and tough man who melts when he saves Polar Bear, a stray he found in the rain.Some smilesbut alas, as in real life [...]


  6. This book is the best book ever Three books in one that I loved so much that I read it twice and liked it even the second time Cleveland Amory s satire is so genius that even though he never met me he wrote this book specifically to me and for me Clearly non cat dog people may not get all of the inside jokes but any animal lover will appreciate Cleveland Amory s contribution to saving animals around the world and the US he is the original creator of our Humane Society.


  7. I did not care for these books at all They seemed less about the cat than they were about the author using the cat as a segue into unrelated anecdotes There were many, many tangents that literally took pages upon pages to get back to the original topic.Polar Bear, for the little I heard of him, seemed adorable.


  8. I did not like this book at all I did not find it entertaining it was like reading a text book I love my cats, but this guy is one of those freaky obsessed cat people, that I just can t relate to.


  9. Combining a wit reminiscent of P.G Wodehouse with a compassion all his own, Cleveland Amory is a good pick not only for cat lovers, but anyone who cares about animals Though he tends towards repetitiveness a little Amory goes a long way , his humor and heart are evident throughout.


  10. I would strongly recommend these books to ANY animal lover Even if you are a dog person, Cleveland Amory smart but witty humor gives a descriptive idea of what you don t think of when you adopt an animal.


  11. This has to be one of my favorite books of all time You have to love cats to like it, but I do The things he says in this book and the stories he tells have stuck with me for years and years.












  12. These books are adorable They are about a curmudgeonly bachelor and his car Polar Bear Cleveland Amory was an extraordinary man who founded Black Beauty Ranch.



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