Jane Eyre

A viral Jane Eyre Author Charlotte Bront Michael Mason Rachel Joyce Arzu Alt nan t Amanda Hale Tom Burke

A viral Jane Eyre Author Charlotte Brontë Michael Mason Rachel Joyce Arzu Altınanıt Amanda Hale Tom Burke Viral Book Charlotte Bront was a British novelist, the eldest out of the three famous Bront sisters whose novels have become standards of English literature See also Emily Bront and Anne Bront.Charlotte Bront was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, England, the third of six children, to Patrick Bront formerly Patrick Brunty , an Irish Anglican clergyman, and his wife, Maria Branwell In April 1820 the family moved a few miles to Haworth, a remote town on the Yorkshire moors, where Patrick had been appointed Perpetual Curate This is where the Bront children would spend most of their lives Maria Branwell Bront died from what was thought to be cancer on 15 September 1821, leaving five daughters and a son to the care of her spinster sister Elizabeth Branwell, who moved to Yorkshire to help the family.In August 1824 Charlotte, along with her sisters Emily, Maria, and Elizabeth, was sent to the Clergy Daughters School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire, a new school for the daughters of poor clergyman which she would describe as Lowood School in Jane Eyre The school was a horrific experience for the girls and conditions were appalling They were regularly deprived of food, beaten by teachers and humiliated for the slightest error The school was unheated and the pupils slept two to a bed for warmth Seven pupils died in a typhus epidemic that swept the school and all four of the Bront girls became very ill Maria and Elizabeth dying of tuberculosis in 1825 Her experiences at the school deeply affected Bront her health never recovered and she immortalised the cruel and brutal treatment in her novel, Jane Eyre Following the tragedy, their father withdrew his daughters from the school.At home in Haworth Parsonage, Charlotte and the other surviving children Branwell, Emily, and Anne continued their ad hoc education In 1826 her father returned home with a box of toy soldiers for Branwell They would prove the catalyst for the sisters extraordinary creative development as they immediately set to creating lives and characters for the soldiers, inventing a world for them which the siblings called Angria The siblings became addicted to writing, creating stories, poetry and plays Bront later said that the reason for this burst of creativity was that We were wholly dependent on ourselves and each other, on books and study, for the enjoyments and occupations of life The highest stimulus, as well as the liveliest pleasure we had known from childhood upwards, lay in attempts at literary composition After her father began to suffer from a lung disorder, Charlotte was again sent to school to complete her education at Roe Head school in Mirfield from 1831 to 1832, where she met her lifelong friends and correspondents, Ellen Nussey and Mary Taylor During this period 1833 , she wrote her novella The Green Dwarf under the name of Wellesley The school was extremely small with only ten pupils meaning the top floor was completely unused and believed to be supposedly haunted by the ghost of a young lady dressed in silk This story fascinated Bront and inspired the figure of Mrs Rochester in Jane Eyre.Bront left the school after a few years, however she swiftly returned in 1835 to take up a position as a teacher, and used her wages to pay for Emily and Anne to be taught at the school However, teaching did not appeal to Bront and in 1838 she left Roe Head to become a governess to the Sidgewick family this was partly from a sense of adventure and a desire to see the world, and partly from financial necessity Charlotte became pregnant soon after her wedding, but her health declined rapidly and, according to Gaskell, she was attacked by sensations of perpetual nausea and ever recurring faintness She died, with her unborn child, on 31 March 1855, aged 38. Fiery love, shocking twists of fate, and tragic mysteries put a lonely governess in jeopardy in JANE EYRE Orphaned as a child, Jane has felt an outcast her whole young life Her courage is tested once again when she arrives at Thornfield Hall, where she has been hired by the brooding, proud Edward Rochester to care for his ward Ad le Jane finds herself drawn to his troublFiery love, shocking twists of fate, and tragic mysteries put a lonely governess in jeopardy in JANE EYRE Orphaned as a child, Jane has felt an outcast her whole young life Her courage is tested once again when she arrives at Thornfield Hall, where she has been hired by the brooding, proud Edward Rochester to care for his ward Ad le Jane finds herself drawn to his troubled yet kind spirit She falls in love Hard But there is a terrifying secret inside the gloomy, forbidding Thornfield Hall Is Rochester hiding from Jane Will Jane be left heartbroken and exiled once again. Good Book Jane Eyre Yes, I suppose you can view this book mostly as a love story. That's what I did at age 13 - but that's why I was left disappointed back then¹.Or you can view this as an story of formation of a strong and independent female protagonist, a nineteenth-century feminist, light-years ahead of its time. And that's what left my now-closer-to-thirty-than-twenty self very satisfied and, quite frankly, rather impressed.²¹(view spoiler)[The guy kept his wife in the attic. Seriously - no. Just no. You don't get all the way to your SECOND wedding forgetting to mention that your FIRST wife is hidden in the attic. Seriosly, Rochester, what the hell is wrong with you? How can you even attempt to build a marriage on such a lie??? (hide spoiler)]² "I do not think, sir, you have any right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience."Sing it, Jane. You tell him, you strong and awesome woman, you!When I read it for the first time as a young and opinionated teen, I thought Jane Eyre was a boring and meek protagonist, too clingy to her 'outdated' morals, too afraid to do what I thought was a brave thing to do - say 'yes' to the apparent happiness that poor tragic Mr. Rochester was offering. (Oh naive young me, putting way too much stock in Rochester's woes after his (view spoiler)[first marriage (hide spoiler)], sleeping with everyone in Europe and rejecting them probably because they were not English enough for him!) Wow, was there ever a way to misunderstand a book more than I did this one? Sometimes life experience does matter indeed.Jane Eyre has a good idea of her self-worth. And she has a good idea about her own morals. And, unlike many in her situation, she sticks to her morals and her idea of what is wrong or right regardless of what outcome is in it for her. Here is the prime example:"Gentlemen in his station are not accustomed to marry their governesses."The emphasis in this well-intentioned advice by Mrs. Fairfax is on the word MARRY. Ah, silly old lady, one may think, cautioning the young woman in such a prudish way. Ah, silly young woman, taking the advice of the old lady and acting prudishly. Ah, silly young woman, eventually rejecting the sincere love and offer of happiness for a seemingly prudish reason - not wanting to be a mistress. So old-fashioned and weak and caged-up, screamed my thirteen-year-old self.But here's the thing. It's not just for the moral lesson for the readers that Bronte has Jane firmly say 'no'. It's not for the sake of mere societal appearance. It's for the sake of Jane, and Jane alone. MARRYING governesses was uncommon. Having them as mistresses - probably not as rare. In her society, protecting her virtue and reputation was not only the matter of religious views or stigma - it was the question of her future, as she had nobody to stand up for her if her reputation was ruined. And it was a question of her integrity - the quality that she maintains through thick and thin, refusing to fall head over heels for love, refusing to let love justify all the mistakes and wrong choices, refusing to let love blind her to everything else that was important for her sense of self-worth.By refusing Rochester, Jane stays so true to herself without ever betraying herself. Jane refuses to take the steps that would destroy her integrity in her own eyes, and for that she has my strongest and most sincere respect and admiration. What Rochester did is unthinkable to her - not because of how others view it but because of her morals and convictions - and she shows unbelievable courage in sticking up for what she believes in, even if it is to her own material and soul-wrecking detriment. She will not give herself fully to something - or someone - that would destroy her integrity, tarnish her own self. And I love her for this unwavering determination to stay true to herself! "Reader, I married him" may be one of the most famous phrases from this book (actually, the most famous, come to think of it) - but it is her refusal to marry him in the first place that allows her to keep her integrity and remain true to self, and continue developing into the amazing person she becomes. Jane has too much self-worth to have Rochester until he redeems himself in her eyes, until he repents. That's the point, not the marriage part.Despite self-proclaimed meekness, Jane Eyre is far from weak or scared. She has been forced to make her own way in life without the luxury of relying on a rich male relative - father, brother, husband. And she did this in the world where being attached to a man was the best choice for a woman (just remember Jane Austen's heroines a few decades earlier reaching happiness only after finding a suitable gentleman!). She is a rebel - setting out to have her own career in a male-dominated world, refusing to let a man rule her life (that applies to both Rochester and St. John here), and making statements that may have not had the most sympathetic audience back in her day:"Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex."And here's what else I enjoyed about this book - its attempts to subvert the tropes, the same tropes that we still heavily rely on in literature. Bronte gets rid of the 'faultless' heroine - instead of being perfect (or having an imaginary flaw, like many literary heroines are prone to nowadays) Jane has a real one (for her time, at least) - her occasional temper. And she is not beautiful - not fake flaws, either but a consensus by many impartial observers that she is not a beauty. And to take it a step further - Mr. Rochester, our romantic lead, is quite frankly, rather ugly. This is not a beautiful couple (and Hollywood managed to "fix" that in all the movie adaptations, by the way - a slap in Bronte's face, I guess?). Jane is not in love with a pretty façade of Rochester - since he has none (a thing that contemporary writers should learn, by the way - writing love that stems from something else that simple attraction to physical beauty). And finally, the atmosphere of this story. Oh, the wonderfully gothic atmosphere written so well, with intense moods palpable in every paragraph. So colorful, so vivid, so immersing - every room, every moor, every tree. Every description of landscape or interior actually serves a purpose to establish the mood of the scene, and it is very well-done..................................All that said, I'm giving a condescending pat on the shoulder to my teenage self from the 'wisdom' of another fifteen years. Sorry, teen Nataliya, you little annoying know-it-all - you just needed to grow up to appreciate this story. 4.5 stars and high recommendation.["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

About Author

  1. Charlotte Bront was a British novelist, the eldest out of the three famous Bront sisters whose novels have become standards of English literature See also Emily Bront and Anne Bront.Charlotte Bront was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, England, the third of six children, to Patrick Bront formerly Patrick Brunty , an Irish Anglican clergyman, and his wife, Maria Branwell In April 1820 the family moved a few miles to Haworth, a remote town on the Yorkshire moors, where Patrick had been appointed Perpetual Curate This is where the Bront children would spend most of their lives Maria Branwell Bront died from what was thought to be cancer on 15 September 1821, leaving five daughters and a son to the care of her spinster sister Elizabeth Branwell, who moved to Yorkshire to help the family.In August 1824 Charlotte, along with her sisters Emily, Maria, and Elizabeth, was sent to the Clergy Daughters School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire, a new school for the daughters of poor clergyman which she would describe as Lowood School in Jane Eyre The school was a horrific experience for the girls and conditions were appalling They were regularly deprived of food, beaten by teachers and humiliated for the slightest error The school was unheated and the pupils slept two to a bed for warmth Seven pupils died in a typhus epidemic that swept the school and all four of the Bront girls became very ill Maria and Elizabeth dying of tuberculosis in 1825 Her experiences at the school deeply affected Bront her health never recovered and she immortalised the cruel and brutal treatment in her novel, Jane Eyre Following the tragedy, their father withdrew his daughters from the school.At home in Haworth Parsonage, Charlotte and the other surviving children Branwell, Emily, and Anne continued their ad hoc education In 1826 her father returned home with a box of toy soldiers for Branwell They would prove the catalyst for the sisters extraordinary creative development as they immediately set to creating lives and characters for the soldiers, inventing a world for them which the siblings called Angria The siblings became addicted to writing, creating stories, poetry and plays Bront later said that the reason for this burst of creativity was that We were wholly dependent on ourselves and each other, on books and study, for the enjoyments and occupations of life The highest stimulus, as well as the liveliest pleasure we had known from childhood upwards, lay in attempts at literary composition After her father began to suffer from a lung disorder, Charlotte was again sent to school to complete her education at Roe Head school in Mirfield from 1831 to 1832, where she met her lifelong friends and correspondents, Ellen Nussey and Mary Taylor During this period 1833 , she wrote her novella The Green Dwarf under the name of Wellesley The school was extremely small with only ten pupils meaning the top floor was completely unused and believed to be supposedly haunted by the ghost of a young lady dressed in silk This story fascinated Bront and inspired the figure of Mrs Rochester in Jane Eyre.Bront left the school after a few years, however she swiftly returned in 1835 to take up a position as a teacher, and used her wages to pay for Emily and Anne to be taught at the school However, teaching did not appeal to Bront and in 1838 she left Roe Head to become a governess to the Sidgewick family this was partly from a sense of adventure and a desire to see the world, and partly from financial necessity Charlotte became pregnant soon after her wedding, but her health declined rapidly and, according to Gaskell, she was attacked by sensations of perpetual nausea and ever recurring faintness She died, with her unborn child, on 31 March 1855, aged 38

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Jane Eyre Comment

  1. Yes, I suppose you can view this book mostly as a love story That s what I did at age 13 but that s why I was left disappointed back then.Or you can view this as an story of formation of a strong and independent female protagonist, a nineteenth century feminist, light years ahead of its time And that s what left my now closer to thirty than twenty self very satisfied and, quite frankly, rather impressed view spoiler The guy kept his wife in the attic Seriously no Just no You don t get all the wa [...]


  2. FIVE REASONS WHY JANE EYRE WOULD NEVER BE A BESTSELLER IN OUR TIMES 5 Four hundred odd pages of purely descriptive writing4 Overt religious themes and moral preaching3 A plain Jane heroine who stays plain No makeovers to reveal a hitherto hidden prettiness that only needed an application of hydrogen peroxide and some eyebrow plucking to emerge full blown.2 The world is not well lost for love In the war between self respect and grand passion, principles win hands down Rousing, yet tender speeches [...]



  3. Reader, I gave it five stars Please let me tell you why Jane Eyre is the quintessential Victorian novel It literally has everything that was typical of the period, but, unlike other novels, it has all the elements in one story At the centre is the romance between Jane and Rochester, which is enhanced by gothic elements such as the uncanniness of the doppleganger and the spectre like qualities of Bertha In addition, it is also a governess novel these were an incredibly popular type of storytellin [...]


  4. There is something deeply attractive about gothic romance Part of its appeal is the sense of intractable eroticism squirming to escape from just beneath the surface The tension in the genre is often generated by a virginal girl s attraction to a dangerous man The pitiful and helpless the heroine the better, but she must also be proud and virtuous, brave and idealistic Her attraction to the ominous hero must be based on pity, not fear He must deserve her idealism Charlotte s Bronte s Jane Eyre , [...]


  5. Child neglect, near death, a dash of magical realism, the power of love, the powerlessness of the poor, sexual rivalry, mystery, madness and It is as powerful as ever but is it really a love story, given Rochester s Svengali tendencies, or is it a life story His downfall and her inheritance make them equal, but is it really love on his part I m not sure, which is what makes it such a good book just not necessarily a love story I also like the tension between it being very Victorian in some obv [...]



  6. The picture disappeared which made the comments rather irrelevant Oh course, Rush Limbaugh is nuts.In December 2007, on a radio show with an audience of 14.5 million, Limbaugh asked this question about the former first lady s presidential prospects, after an incredibly unflattering picture of her had surfaced Will Americans want to watch a woman get older before their eyes on a daily basis I want you to understand that I m talking about the evolution of American culture here, and not so much Mrs [...]


  7. I m bumping Jane Eyre up to the full five stars on this reread It has its Victorian melodramatic moments horrible aunt and cousins view spoiler mad wife secretly hidden away in the attic heroine starving in the wilderness hide spoiler , but overall I found this story of a plain, obscure girl determined to maintain her self respect, and do what she feels is right even in the face of pressure, profoundly moving And I m a romantic, so yeah, that aspect totally sucked me in too And it really is a gr [...]


  8. Jane, be still don t struggle so like a wild, frantic bird, that is rending its own plumage in its desperation I am no bird and no net ensnares me I am a free human being, with an independent will which I now exert to leave you I am glad that in 1847 Charlotte Bronte made the decision to publish her novel under a male pseudonym Currer Bell had a much better chance of being published than Charlotte Bronte and, with reviewers and readers assuming that she was in fact a male writer, allowed the nov [...]


  9. I read this book back in High School I hated it I thought it was boring and stupid and all I wanted to do was spread the word that this book was terrible and no one should read it I had it marked one star on and it had a home on my least favorite shelf.Well, I have been waiting years to find the perfect place to use this gif I reread in late August, early September 2017 I have to say that I should probably reread everything I read bank in High School to get a better perspective I enjoyed the boo [...]


  10. I often think of classics as required reading, usually accompanied by a barely suppressed groan Because, surely, they can t actually be any good I m not sure why I ve always associated well known and well loved classics as such, but I suppose it must be the expectation to love it just as much as the world It s silly, I know A person can t be expected to love all books, classic status or not, but still, I wondered if I would enjoy it.Jane Eyre is one of those novels that proves me completely wron [...]


  11. Now I know why Charlotte Bronte said this of Jane Austen The passions are perfectly unknown to her she rejects even a speaking acquaintance with that stormy sisterhood I love Jane, but Charlotte REALLY knows how to write about passion, romantic or otherwise If Jane s books are stately minuets in which the smallest gesture has its meaning, Charlotte s is a spirited, sweeping tango of duty and desire A perfect blend of passionate romance, gothic mystery, romantic description of nature, social comm [...]


  12. I, Ana, take you, Mr Rochester, to be my lawful wedded husband I m sure my boyfriend won t mind.Back off fangirls, he is mine.I needed something to make me stop thinking about Heathcliff and Catherine and theirhorrorlove story So, naturally, I chose Jane Eyre Yes, it s dark but nowhere nearly as scary as Wuthering Heights It s actually quite romantic Ok, he locked his wife in the attic In those days people didn t get divorced If you had a crazy spouse, you locked them in the attic That s how it [...]


  13. I think this may be my favourite book of all time.Video Review youtube watch v 2E8ysAround the Year in 52 Books Challenge Notes 11 A book from the Rory Gil Challenge


  14. SPOILER ALERT YOU MAY NOT WANT TO READ THIS REVIEW IF YOU PLAN ON READING JANE EYRE.I read Jane Eyre for the first time as an adult and I can t help but feel sorry for every junior high or high school student who was forced to read this book I thought getting through this book was very difficult I assumed I would love it since I generally love books by Jane Austen, but I didn t find many similarities at all Jane Eyre was boring and unbelievable I did enjoy the first half of the book because I ha [...]


  15. Jane Eyre makes me want to be a better person Her goodness, her humility, her frankness, her passion, her fierce will and her moral compass are all inspiring.And yet, I also love her faults Jane has a temper, she gets jealous, she fights back, and at times she is too obedient, especially when given orders by overbearing men.What is it about this gothic novel that still makes it a compelling read than 160 years after it was published I first came to this story, as I suspect many have, through th [...]


  16. EDIT 22 04 2015 The following review was written in paroxysms of adoration which I no longer feel hence a star is being ducked Now that I have read Wide Sargasso Sea and re read Wuthering Heights, Rochester and Jane s attraction as characters of high morals has waned in my eyes But until I write a balanced critique of this, I refrain from disowning my first impressions.____What do I write about you Jane Words fall short when I try to Jane, you are so much a part of me as I am yours.You are so m [...]


  17. I just finished this book in the early hours of the morning, and I m left with a heavy but happy heart and a smile on my face I clung to those last pages like nothing else not wanting the story to end and this is even a reread for me This goes to show how much I love this book and this journey of Jane I think what I love the most is exactly the fact that it takes you on an amazing journey, and Jane changes so radically from beginning to end As a reader, you are rooting for her and your feelings [...]


  18. It seems silly to say that a book can affect you on a profound level well I definitely believe in this power that a good book has Jane Eyre is one of them I cannot say that this was an easy book to read But it was a book that I was very enriched by reading Romance is a genre that is looked down on by many sophisticated readers Perhaps they would look down on Jane Eyre, but would probably get some eyebrows raised at them Well Jane Eyre is the archetype for the romance novel After having read thou [...]


  19. I get the feeling that Jane Eyre may have ruined future English classics for me I find it hard to imagine other classics topping this one This was actually a book that I had no interest in reading because I had been underwhelmed by a Jane Eyre miniseries I watched several years ago However, so many people have urged me to read this, saying it s an excellent book, and they weren t wrong.Jane Eyre is definitely cut from a different cloth from the other classic novel heroines I have come across She [...]



  20. One of the most beloved novels in history for many generations Jane Eyre , is set in England, in the 1800 s The story of a neglected girl orphan, of that name, who never gives up her dream of happiness, no matter how remote a possibility, that goal, can ever be reached Hated by her cruel Aunt Mrs Sarah Reed NOT A BLOOD RELATIVE , and cousins, Eliza, jealous of her beautiful, but spiteful sister Georgiana, and abused by them both They look down at the beggar, this little poor girl, this impositi [...]


  21. I just really love this book Jane is such a strong strong character who does what she believes is right no matter what and the SASS is so real I love it.As per usual, I loved it, though I feel like the older I get the I notice the seriously problematic things in it.But Jane is still the best.


  22. Classics are books which, the we think we know them through hearsay, the original, unexpected, and innovative we find them when we actually read them Italo Calvino, Why Read the Classics There is no second or third or nineteenth time for me This is the first time I have read Jane Eyre and this is the first time I ve read anyone like her Did I take forever to say hello to Jane Not at all There couldn t have been a better timing since at present, my mind is in perfect harmony with my heart and [...]


  23. A CELEBRITY DEATHMATCH REVIEW Hamlet vs Jane Eyre Setting A small town in the Old West Sheriff Hamlet is relaxing out in front of the General Store Suddenly Polonius comes running down the middle of the dirt road at the center of town, waving his hands in the air, shouting EVERYBODY RUN FOR YOUR LIVES JANE EYRE AND THE BRONTE POSSE IS COMING TO TOWN The townspeople all scramble out of sight Store owners pull the shades down Sheriff Hamlet remains cucumber cool with his legs crossed, reading in t [...]


  24. One of my reading goals is to read as much classic literature as I can And I am glad that I chose this book Jane Eyre tells a story of a very likable personage orphan girl Jane Eyre who, after her parents deaths lived with her aunt and three cousins who heartily hated her, then at the age of 10 she was sent to a special school orphanage where after spending 8 years she became a teacher and later a governess at a rich household As the story progresses we see Jane mature from a young rebellious th [...]



  25. The funny thing about this novel is not how enlightened it is for the time period, because it really isn t all that enlightened, right Mr Rochester How s that first wife hanging in the attic Or how closely aligned to modern ideas of equality between the sexes and finding an equitable arrangement between them it is, because it only happens to conform to the standards of romantic literature of the time, where happy endings happen Windfall out of nowhere Really Trope, much And how does that subvert [...]


  26. Jane Eyre is one of those books everyone says you have to read one day, often mentioned in one breath along with classics like Pride and Prejudice or Wuthering Heights, and I agree This is an important novel about female independence, the development into an adult human being and the search for one s true destination in juxtaposition with traditional ideals and guidelines.But not only is it an important novel Charlotte Bront managed to include elements of humor, romance, gothic fiction and even [...]


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